Using gamification to improve health – (part 2 of 2)

This is my answer for the second written assignment of the Gamification class I’m taking through Coursera. The full question is available here.

Describe in general terms a gamified system that could effectively motivate behaviour change to improve the health of city employees. Specifically, explain how the system would effectively incorporate intrinsic motivation, extrinsic motivation, or both. Your answer should address the fact that this is an internal gamification project, targeted at the institutional goals of the city government. The system can use any technology (or no technology!), so long as the resources required seem justified by the scope of the opportunity.

(via Cornell University Library archive)
(via Cornell University Library archive)

Continue reading Using gamification to improve health – (part 2 of 2)

Countdown to Global Service Jam Smithfield

How exciting! My welcome pack for Global Service Jam Smithfield arrived today. I’m really looking forward to getting involved a worldwide service design challenge at the Truth offices in Smithfield this weekend. There are a few places left. Why don’t you come too?

GSJSmithfield-2

What is service design?

“Service design is a method for improving the quality of your service. Those improvements are directed at both the users and staff of your organization. Innovating in services is not new. Every organization that provides services thinks seriously about improving the quality of its service at some point.
Continue reading Countdown to Global Service Jam Smithfield

Using gamification to improve health – (part 1 of 2)

This is the question for the second written assignment of the Gamification class I’m taking through Coursera. My answer will follow soon.

Photo via National Media Museum and Flickr Commons
Photo via National Media Museum and Flickr Commons

You are approached by Ryan Morrison, the mayor of a medium-sized city in the Midwest of the United States. He has heard that you know a lot about gamification and believes that gamification techniques can transform city government.
Continue reading Using gamification to improve health – (part 1 of 2)

Do Something Different 1: Eat Different

I’m taking an online course in Creative Problem Solving via Coursera and the University of Minnesota. One way it aims to challenge and develop the creativity of participants is by asking them to take on unusual challenges called Do Something Different. The first challenge was Eat Different.

Conceptualize, plan in advance and eat something different. Eat something different; that is, eat something completely different, not something that has been just left out of your diet; suggestions: a different culture, an entirely new creation, or a different manner or definition of eating. You should understand that this is not an assignment solely about food, but about the process of eating, literally and figuratively. Again, plan and implement your plan; report on the results”

This is my entry.


Continue reading Do Something Different 1: Eat Different

Highlights from Product Camp London 2014

Product Camp is an unconference for product managers. There is no schedule, no keynote speaker, no list of hot topics prepared in advance. Instead, those who want to speak claim a spot, write their title on the board, and see who comes along.

Photo by @simoncast
Photo by @simoncast

Talks run simultaneously, so it’s impossible to see everything. These are my highlights of Product Camp London 2014. Continue reading Highlights from Product Camp London 2014

What doctors don’t know about the drugs they prescribe

This is the last week of one of the courses I’m studying through Coursera – Critical Thinking in Global Challenges. The final exam asked students to apply their critical thinking skills to the problem of publication bias in medicine. One of the sources we were asked to evaluate was this TED talk by Dr Ben Goldacre.

I make no secret of my admiration for Ben Goldacre. I loved his Guardian columns, and I think his book Bad Science is a must-read for anybody who aims to make evidence-based decisions. His campaigning for the the findings of all clinical trials to be reported, AllTrials, is commendable, and this TED talk explains why it matters so much.

Bonus: here’s an article from the NY Times on publication bias from 1999.

PRODUCT RELATIONSHIP MANAGEMENT by EVRYTHNG

In his talk “The Future is not an Internet-connected Egg Box,” Alex Jones of Fjord highlighted one of the major gaps in thinking about the internet of things. We shouldn’t link every device to the internet just because we can. Instead, the act of connecting must add value to the experience of using the product. The human layer of the interaction is where meaning and value is added. We don’t need to hook up our egg box to the internet. We need to make connected products mean something to the people using them. In the white paper Product Relationship Management, Evrythng CEO Andy Hobsbawn sets out a clear and compelling vision of how to make that happen.

“It’s time for our physical products to be as clever as Google, as immediate as Twitter, as informative as Wikipedia, as social as Facebook, as useful as Evernote, as personal as Amazon, and as entertaining as YouTube.”

PRM-title
Continue reading PRODUCT RELATIONSHIP MANAGEMENT by EVRYTHNG

Five reasons to use gamification to market breakfast pastries. (part 2 of 2)

This is my answer for the first written assignment for the Gamification class I’m taking through Coursera. You can read the question in full here.


Provide as many reasons as you can why gamification could be a useful technique to apply to the situation your manager has presented to you. Explain why these reasons address the specific scenario provided. At this stage, focus on the problem rather than the solution. In other words, describe the goals of the project, not the particular game elements or other techniques you plan to use.


Why would gamification be useful in marketing a new line of breakfast pastries? I will outline five reasons.

Why use gamification to market breakfast pastries? (part 1 of 2)

This is the first written assignment for the Gamification class I’m taking through Coursera. I’ll publish my answer later this week.


Why use gamification to market breakfast pastries?

Project Part I: Definition

You are an employee of Cereals Incorporated, a large manufacturer of breakfast food products.  Your supervisor, Madison County, approaches you because she knows you recently took a course on gamification, which she has heard will revolutionize marketing.  She tells you that Cereals Inc. is about to release a new line of ready-to-eat breakfast pastries, and she wants to know whether to use gamification as part of the marketing strategy.  The breakfast pastries will be aimed at the 18-35 age bracket. Surveys show members of this demographic often skip breakfast because they don’t want to eat the typical cereals of their youth, and they are too active to cook their own breakfasts. 

Market research indicates that the pastries are likely to appeal more to women than men by a 65%-35% ratio. Cereals Inc. has a 35% share of the overall breakfast food market, but only a 10% share of the fragmented ready-to-eat segment.
Continue reading Why use gamification to market breakfast pastries? (part 1 of 2)